Well, no duh...

Jun. 23rd, 2017 03:20 pm
nwhiker: (Default)
[personal profile] nwhiker
At this point, liberals are acting like idiots, going on and on about how many people the Senate bill is likely to kill, who is going to lose health insurance and probably die, how much more dangerous it will be a woman giving, how having a disability shouldn't be death sentence etc.

But here is the thing that they are eliding.

Those deaths? ARE A FEATURE OF THE BILL NOT A BUG.

Survival of the... fittest, the richest, the strongest, the male-ist.

The rest of us? Eh. Who cares?

The whole plan of attach of pointing out how many people will be hurt by the bill is wasted time and effort. The Republicans don't care. The rest of us have no power.

More Brexit polling

Jun. 23rd, 2017 09:16 pm
[syndicated profile] uk_polling_report_feed

Posted by Anthony Wells

A year on from the EU referendum there was some new YouGov polling for the Times this morning. The country remain quite evenly split over whether Brexit is right or wrong, 44% think leaving was the right decision, 45% the wrong decision. There is not much optimism about negotiations – only 26% expect the government to achieve a deal that is good for Britain, 31% expect a poor deal, 15% expect no deal at all (that said, most don’t think Labour would be doing any better – 24% think they’d get a better deal, 34% a worse deal, 20% that it would end up much the same).

Asked to choose between Britain having full control over immigration from Europe or British businesses having free access to trade with the EU people preferred trade by 58% to 42%. As I wrote in my last post, there’s a lot of variation in questions like this depending on the specific wording, but the overall picture suggests that when people are pushed to choose they do think trade is more important than control of immigration (though among Conservative voters the balance is the other way round).

On other matters, on the question of who would make the best Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn now leads Theresa May by a single point – 35% to 34%. This is the first time that Corbyn has led in the question – this is partially because of a sharp drop in Theresa May’s ratings (before the snap election she was consistently in the high 40s), but is also due to a significant increase in Jeremy Corbyn’s ratings. Again, if you look at the longer term ratings he used to be consistenty down in the teens.

Full tabs are here

I should also add an update on polling about the second referendum. In my last post I mentioned the Survation poll for the Mail on Sunday which found that the balance of opinion was in favour of having a second referendum on the terms of the Brexit deal. This was the first time any poll had shown this, and I said it was worth looking to see if other polls found the same. Well, so far they haven’t – Survation also had a poll for Good Morning Britain on Monday, that also had a question on a second referendum, and it found 38% of people supported it and 57% were opposed. Tabs for that are here.

Friday post intended for unclutter

Jun. 23rd, 2017 05:24 pm
adair: (Default)
[personal profile] adair
This was meant for unclutter but got here instead. I cant figure out how to delete it without a lot of fussing.

did not get much decluttering done this week - too busy with other things to give it a lot of time.
I did take 5 books and about a weeks worth of newspaper to B2P - I use newspaper in packing.
Three different books came back with me in a little case labeled Hogwarts Library. These showed up in the workroom, and I remembered one of the prison libraries asked for them, so they will go in the big plastic box in the garage awaiting the next book pickup.

I did putter around throwing away little sample-size bottles of hand lotion left from travel, that I somehow thought I would squeeze the last drops out of. They had been sitting around for months. I also threw away a lot of little packets of sample skin treatments that came in catalogs I got in the mail. I clearly was not going to try them, so out they went. It's part of that It Might Come In Handy Some Day that causes a lot of saving of objects for no good reason. I need to apply the same clear out process to my makeup drawer, with stuff I bought but never used much. None of this makes a lot of new space, but at least it helps clear surfaces.
[syndicated profile] acm_news_feed

An analysis of four icy bodies discovered in the outer Solar System reveals no sign that they are being influenced by a large, unseen planet lurking beyond Neptune.

Hi!

Jun. 23rd, 2017 05:33 pm
berryandthorn: (gamora)
[personal profile] berryandthorn posting in [community profile] addme
Name: berryandthorn

Age: 20s

Interests & Hobbies: Reading, writing, fairy tales, monsters, folklore, ghost stories, female characters who aren't necessarily likeable; Marvel (mostly the movies and Netflix shows), DC (mostly Batman comics), young adult and children's books, literature and critical theory, Peter Pan, the Monstrumologist series by Rick Yancey; Neil Gaiman, Megan Whalen Turner, Gillian Flynn, Terry Pratchett, and Dorothy Allison; Treasure Planet, Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Sicario, The Walking Dead, Turn: Washington's Spies, Don't Trust the A in Apt. 23, LOTR, Star Wars; pirates, history, fanfiction (I don't post any on this account, but I love reading it and I'm always up to discuss my favorites), blogging, crafting (very rarely), libraries, the ocean, psychology and sociology, feminism. 

Looking For: people who enjoy reading, people who write fanfic and/or original fiction, people who share similar interests, people who love creating things, or anyone who's interested! I'm pretty new to DW, so I'm looking to make friends. 

[syndicated profile] bruce_schneier_feed

Posted by Bruce Schneier

A paddleboarder had a run-in with an injured giant squid. Video. Here's the real story.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

How? Just HOW?

Jun. 23rd, 2017 03:05 pm
nwhiker: (Default)
[personal profile] nwhiker
Linnea just walked in from her last day of middle school/junior high. High school next year.

How did my baby get so big?

David and I walked her 3/4 of the way to the bus stop this morning, but we stopped before we got to the point where any of the other kids could see us. Don't want to ruin her cool factor, you know.

Sweet Linnea.

And Monday, she's headed for 10 days in Scotland and Ireland. Without ME.
[syndicated profile] the_map_room_feed

Posted by Jonathan Crowe

An “original,” hand-drawn presentation map of Disneyland is one of nearly a thousand Disney-related artifacts to be auctioned on Sunday by Van Eaton Galleries. From the catalog:

This is the original presentation map of Disneyland that was created by Walt Disney and Herb Ryman in 1953. This map was then the main presentation piece for Roy Disney’s meetings with potential investors in New York, which succeeded in getting Disney the financing from ABC that was necessary to build Disneyland. This same map returned from New York and was displayed at the Disney Studio where it was used by Walt in numerous development meetings throughout the remainder of 1953 and into 1954. Later in 1954, this map received newly inked outlines and additional color, and was used as the first publicly released full-image of Disneyland. The significance of this map in the history of Disneyland cannot be overstated.

The auction ruffled a few feathers when it hit the news last month, partly because of media reports attributing the map to Disney himself, or calling it the original map, which it isn’t. Theme Park Insider notes that “[t]he original concept map of Disneyland, hand-drawn by Herb Ryman in 1953, sits safely in the archives of Walt Disney Imagineering. It’s not for sale and likely never will be.” A post on the Friends of The Walt Disney Family Museum Facebook page goes further, calling the map to be auctioned

a large-format photostat or brownline of Herb Ryman’s original drawing, which is safe and sound in the Walt Disney Imagineering Art Library. Dozens of these were made to pitch the Park to investors and participants. Shame on Van Eaton for knowingly misrepresenting a big photocopy as a valuable artifact worth a million dollars.

In a comment on that post, Van Eaton Galleries defended themselves by clarifying that the map being auctioned is the original presentation map, not Ryman’s original pencil drawing on vellum.

Vellum is a fragile paper, like a tracing paper. It’s not the kind of paper you would take to New York as your main presentation piece. What vellum is exceptionally good for though, is letting light through during the brownline process, as the “Disney historian” mentioned. The vellum pencil drawing was used to transfer the line work to this map, which was then hand colored, inked, mounted to a presentation board, and taken to New York by Roy Disney to pitch to ABC. The vellum pencil drawing was never intended to be the final product, otherwise Ryman would have drawn it directly onto a more durable paper for Roy to take. It was however, used to create the map that we are bringing to auction.

(The New York Times article on the auction was corrected to reflect that distinction. For other coverage, see ABC News and CNN, among many others.)

Wasting time

Jun. 23rd, 2017 05:46 pm
thnidu: Oh, noes! (LJ icon) You are in a maze of twisty little LJ entries (check one): All different \ All alike. lj:redaxe (mazeoftwistylittleljentries)
[personal profile] thnidu
Somebody just asked on Quora
I posted the first reply:

Who can tell? Look how arbitrary the QWERTY keyboard is, designed to slow typing down as much as possible so the first mechanical typewriters wouldn’t jam.

I can make a WAG that on a computer keyboard it would be put on Option-S (or Alt-S), which is a logical place for it. Which means that Microsoft would put it someplace else entirely. ;-p

Of courſe, that could eaſily create confuſion if uſers weren’t uſed to it. And that would really ſuck.

Maybe tonight I'll post why I'm procrastinating so badly. Or at least my excuse for it.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
[personal profile] rfmcdonald

  • Steve Munro reports on the many problems associated with implementing new express buses, in Toronto and elsewhere.

  • Global News was one of many sources reporting on the high rate of failure of the new Bombardier streetcars.

  • Ben Spurr notes the astounding failure of the City of Toronto to do basic things at Union Station, like collect rent.

  • Transit Toronto notes that GO Transit's seasonal routes to Niagara have started today and will go until 4 September.

[syndicated profile] arstechnica_feed

Posted by Sean Gallagher

Enlarge / Hardly anyone is buying these. (credit: Crackberry)

BlackBerry Ltd, the company that once led the world's "smartphone" market and ruled the corporate mobile e-mail world, posted its financials today for the most recent three months, and they were not pretty. Software and professional services sales were down by 4.7 percent, totaling $101 million for the quarter, and as a result the company missed analyst expectations for revenue by a wide mark.

The news comes as a blow to investors, who had pumped up the price of BlackBerry's stock by about 60 percent over the past three months—largely because people were so bullish on BlackBerry's software sales exploding. Today, the company's share price fell by over 12 percent before close. In fact, the company only turned a profit because of a $940 million payment from Qualcomm to settle arbitration over royalty payments.

In 2016, BlackBerry completely outsourced manufacturing of its phones. Since then, revenues from phone sales have collapsed—totaling $37 million for the quarter ending May 31, compared to $152 million last year.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[syndicated profile] arstechnica_feed

Posted by David Kravets

Alexandra Elbakyan.

Alexandra Elbakyan. (credit: Alexandra Elbakyan)

The operator of a searchable piracy site for scientific research papers has been ordered to pay $15 million as fallout from a US copyright infringement lawsuit brought by one of the world's leading scientific publishers, New York-based Elsevier.

The award doesn't mean the six-year-old Sci-Hub site is shuttering, though, despite being ordered to do so. The site has been engaged in a game of domain Whac-a-Mole ever since the case was filed in New York federal court nearly two years ago. And it doesn't mean that the millions of dollars in damages will get paid, either. The developer of the Pirate Bay-like site for academic research—Alexandra Elbakyan of Russia—has repeatedly said she wouldn't pay any award. She didn't participate in the court proceedings, either. US District Judge Robert Sweet issued a default judgement (PDF) against the site this week, but Sci-Hub remains online.

Elsevier markets itself as a leading provider of science, medical, and health "information solutions." The infringing activity is of its subscription database called "ScienceDirect." Elsevier claims ScienceDirect is "home to almost one-quarter of the world's peer-reviewed, full-text scientific, technical, and medical content."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

sturgeonslawyer: (Art)
[personal profile] sturgeonslawyer
This is, quite possibly, the best autobio I have read by a popular musician. The only one that competes with it is the _Real Frank Zappa Book_. Like FZ's book, Bruford's focusses less on the details of his life and recordings and more on the things that interest and occupy him: which are _quite_ different from those that occupied the late Zappa's peculiar mind.

Bruford meanders back and forth along a vaguely-chronological path from his first public appearance at 14 to his retirement from public performance at 59, with stops at Yes and King Crimson, Genesis and Earthworks, a path that led from solo practice to rock to progressive rock to electric rock to jazz - with, again, meanders back and forth between them (as when the not-quite-newly-minted jazz drummer returned to play with the "double-trio" version of King Crimson in the mid-'90s). He comments a little on the personalities he's worked with, but this is no dish-o-rama; his colleagues are treated, each and all, with respect. Perhaps the closest thing to a snark in the book is this comment on guitarist Robert Fripp: "On a good night, the seated man appeared unhappy about something, and on a bad night unhappy about everything."

What the book is chock full of is discourses on the musical industry; on the meaning of music in itself, in commerce, in society, and to individuals; on the contrasted working lives of rock and jazz musicians; and on what rhythm is, where it comes from, and how it works.

Even if you have no interest in Bruford's music, either in rock or in jazz, this is a fascinating read.

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