Welcome

Dec. 4th, 2020 08:20 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
You can find more info on my userinfo page - but this is just here to say that I'm very happy to be friended by anyone that wants to read me. I rarely post friends-only, and that only tends to be about things that mention work, so if I don't friend you back you're not actually missing much...

If you do friend me, this would be a good place to leave a comment introducing yourself, and letting me know how you found me!

I have lots of awesome friends - if you want to make a few more then take a look at here for Dreamwidth and here for Livejournal, add a few people, and leave comment so people can add you too.

The links posts come from my page at Delicious and are posted to DW and LJ via a web app which I wrote, and you can use yourself here.


A note to Livejournal users:
You can easily leave comments using OpenID - this allows you to "sign in" using your LJ id, and that way I can tell you're you!

A note on correcting people's grammar in the comments.

Official Spoiler Policy.
andrewducker: (Default)
andrewducker: (Default)
In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. "How are we to live in an atomic age?" I am tempted to reply: "Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents."

In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the atomic bomb was invented: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors - anaesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.

This is the first point to be made: and the first action to be taken is to pull ourselves together. If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things - praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts - not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.


Thanks to [personal profile] hollymath and [personal profile] white_hart for that.
andrewducker: (Default)
I was reading the poor reviews of Alien: Covenant and thinking about Ridley Scott. And then ended up watching The Martian with Jane, as she hadn't seen it, and was reminded how great he is at his best. So I figured I'd go through his filmography and mark them up for enjoyment factor.

Blade Runner: Gorgeous. And the plot works. And it has some great moments. And nothing which made me furious. But it's a bit too cold for me. I don't love it, but I am glad I've seen it.(About four times now, in an attempt to like it more.) 6/10
Alien: Amazing realisation of a fictional future. Fantastic design. Lots of iconic moments. Hangs together really well as a film, and I'm glad I saw it at the cinema a couple of years ago. 8/10
Legend: Very silly. Doesn't quite work. But Tim Curry is really, really good in it, and it looks beautiful, and I can forgive it its weaknesses. 6/10
(Thelma and Louise I feel bad for not having seen. Sorry!)
Gladiator: I didn't buy into the hype, and it felt overly glossy. Nicely made, and a better movie of its type than we'd seen in a while. 6/10
Hannibal: I really wanted to like this. But he managed to make a film about a charismatic serial killer dull. I literally wondered _during_ the film how he managed to make it so dull. 3/10
Matchstick Men: A fun romp that I solidly enjoyed at the time. The characters are having so much fun I couldn't help but join them. 8/10
Kingdom of Heaven: A Ridley Scott movie I enjoyed _more_ than most people. It felt like it had been hacked up though, and I wasn't surprised there was a directors cut. Which I will someday see! 7/10
Prometheus: A film I despised more because it could have been amazing than anything else. But sadly it fills me with rage. 2/10 (4/10 if you include the fun I had reading meta about it later.)
The Martian: An incredibly well made film that was dramatic, and gorgeous, and funny. I wish there were more films like this. Slightly _too_ many thing go wrong for me, but it's nigh perfect. 9/10
andrewducker: (Default)
andrewducker: (Default)
andrewducker: (Default)
I'm curious to know if I do - and if so, what advantages it has over any of the various other cryptocurrencies...

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